Andy Warhol was a leading figure in the Pop Art movement. Like his contemporaries Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg, Warhol responded to mass-media culture of the 1960s. Andy Warhol silkscreens of cultural and consumer icons – including Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Campbell’s Soup Cans, and Brillo Boxes – would make him one of the most famous artists of his generation.
Born Andrew Warhola on August 6, 1928 in Pittsburgh, PA, he graduated from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1949. Moving to New York to pursue a career in commercial illustration, the young artist worked for magazine such as Vogue and Glamour.

In 1964, Andy Warhol rented a studio loft on East 47th street in Midtown Manhattan which was later known as The Factory. The artist used The Factory as a hub for movie stars, models, and artists, who became fodder for his prints and films. The space also functioned as a performance venue for The Velvet Underground. During the 1980s, Warhol collaborated with several younger artists, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente, and Keith Haring.
Today, Andy Warhol‘s artworks are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Tate Gallery in London, among others.

A major retrospective of Andy Warhol‘s artworks took place at the Whiney Museum of Art in New York in 2019.

Andy Warhol, Mao (F&S II. 97) (particular), 1972
Screenprint on paper 91.4 x 91.4 cm

Andy Warhol, Mao (F&S II. 97) (particular), 1972
Screenprint on paper 91.4 x 91.4 cm

Andy Warhol was a leading figure in the Pop Art movement. Like his contemporaries Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg, Warhol responded to mass-media culture of the 1960s. Andy Warhol silkscreens of cultural and consumer icons – including Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Campbell’s Soup Cans, and Brillo Boxes – would make him one of the most famous artists of his generation.
Born Andrew Warhola on August 6, 1928 in Pittsburgh, PA, he graduated from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1949. Moving to New York to pursue a career in commercial illustration, the young artist worked for magazine such as Vogue and Glamour.

In 1964, Andy Warhol rented a studio loft on East 47th street in Midtown Manhattan which was later known as The Factory. The artist used The Factory as a hub for movie stars, models, and artists, who became fodder for his prints and films. The space also functioned as a performance venue for The Velvet Underground. During the 1980s, Warhol collaborated with several younger artists, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente, and Keith Haring.
Today, Andy Warhol‘s artworks are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Tate Gallery in London, among others.

A major retrospective of Andy Warhol‘s artworks took place at the Whiney Museum of Art in New York in 2019.

andy warhol Works

Andy Warhol – King of Pop Art intervened on every single work of art he created, with the aid of the screen printing system. Few colors and clear margins create a silhouette effect that refers to advertising signs. Because art, according to the Pittsburgh genius, is “mass” and “democratic”, like consumption in the America of the economic boom.

Below you will find all our Andy Warhol works for sale, including updated prices. You can choose between “after” screen prints, which are screen prints made after the artist’s death but respecting the quality and subjects of the original works, and original signed and numbered screen prints, authentic works of art designed and created by Andy Warhol.

 

Andy Warhol, Mao, 1972

Andy Warhol

Mao, 1972

Screenprint in colors on paper

91.4 x 91.4 cm

Andy Warhol, Hans Christian Andersen, 1987

Andy Warhol

Hans Christian Andersen, 1987

Screen printing on Lenox Museum Board

96.5 x 96.5 cm

Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen, 1975

Andy Warhol

Ladies and Gentlemen, 1975

Screen printing on paper

95.3 × 64.7 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.26

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) 11.26

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Brillo Soap Pads, 1970

Andy Warhol

Pasadena Art Museum – Brillo, 1970

Color screen printing on paper

76 × 66 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.25

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) 11.25

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.27

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) 11.27

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.28

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) 11.28

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Flowers 11.72

Andy Warhol (after)

Flowers (Sunday b. Morning) 11.72

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Tomato Soup

Andy Warhol (after)

Tomato Soup (Sunday b. Morning)

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

89 × 58.5 cm

Andy Warhol, Mao – Hot Pink

Andy Warhol (after)

Mao Hot Pink (Sunday b. Morning)

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

85 × 75 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe Hot Pink

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) Hot Pink (11.22)

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.24

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) Black edition (11.24)

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Mao – Yellow

Andy Warhol (after)

Mao-Yellow (Sunday b. Morning)

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

85 × 75 cm

Andy Warhol, Magazine and History, 1983

Andy Warhol

Magazine and History, 1983

Screenprint and offset lithograph on Rives paper

85,1 × 69,8 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.31

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) Pink edition (11.31)

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.30

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) 11.30

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Flowers, 11.67

Andy Warhol (after)

Flowers (Sunday b. Morning) 11.67

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 11.23

Andy Warhol (after)

Marilyn Monroe (Sunday b. Morning) 11.23

Silkscreen printed on ‘museum board’

91 × 91 cm

andy warhol News

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol, a multifaceted and brilliant artist, perhaps one of the best known exponents of contemporary art, is considered by all to be the father of Pop Art.

However, there are many curiosities about life and his works that not everyone knows. Here are 15 to read all in one go.

Andy Warhol
The story of Andy Warhol’s popular screen prints made by Sunday b. Morning, from the first Marilyn to subsequent editions, Warhol decided to accept this initially unauthorized production.
Andy Warhol
“Everything is treated with the same importance, as everything is a commodity, from Coca Cola (it tastes the same for me and Marilyn Monroe!) to the human destiny of a movie star”.
The Marilyn Monroe icon is isolated in the center of an aseptic background. The head is severed from the body, flat. The photographic process, revealed and forced to the point of overexposure, dissects the face into precise interlocking colors, indifferently inverted.
Follow us and stay up to date with our exclusive Newsletter

© 2022 The Strip Gallery SRLs unipersonale | All Rights Reserved – P.I. IT11804940960